Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Monday, Jul 6, 2020


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
  • The Court may announce opinions on the homepage beginning at 10 a.m. If more than one opinion will be issued, they will post in approximately ten minute intervals. The Court will not take the Bench.
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Recent Decisions


July 06, 2020
         
Colorado Dept. of State v. Baca (19-518) (Per Curiam)
The Tenth Circuit’s judgment is reversed for the reasons stated in Chiafalo v. Washington, 591 U. S. ___.

         
Barr v. American Assn. of Political Consultants, Inc. (19-631)
The Fourth Circuit’s judgment—that the robocall restriction’s government-debt exception in 47 U. S. C. §227(b)(1)(A)(iii) violates the First Amendment but is severable from the remainder of the statute—is affirmed.

         
Chiafalo v. Washington (19-465)
A State may enforce an elector’s pledge to support his party’s nominee—and the state voters’ choice—for President.



June 30, 2020
         
Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com B. V. (19-46)
A term styled “generic.com” is a generic name for a class of goods or services—and thus ineligible for federal trademark protection—only if the term has that meaning to consumers.

         
Espinoza v. Montana Dept. of Revenue (18-1195)
The application of the Montana Constitution’s “no-aid” provision to a state program providing tuition assistance to parents who send their children to private schools discriminated against religious schools and the families whose children attend or hope to attend them in violation of the Federal Constitution’s Free Exercise Clause.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Two Oaths Required


After a Supreme Court nominee is confirmed by the Senate, the new Justice takes two oaths. The first legislative act approved by Congress in 1789 was the Oath of Office. This Constitutional Oath is taken by all federal employees who swear to support and defend the Constitution. The second oath Justices take is the Judicial Oath during which they swear to administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich. This oath was established under the Judiciary Act of 1789. There are no rules about who must administer the oath, however; typically, these oaths are administered by a senior Justice, a Judge or a clerk of Court. One of the most unique places the oath was taken was the Sprague Hotel in Colorado when Harlan Fiske Stone became Chief Justice while on vacation.

For more information about the Oaths of Office taken by the Chief Justices, click here.

 

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Harlan Fiske Stone (right) being sworn-in as Chief Justice, July 3, 1941. Stone took both oaths in his cottage at the Sprague Hotel before Wayne H. Hackett, the United States Commissioner for Rocky Mountain National Park. Abner Sprague, owner of the hotel, is standing in the background. Stone’s first duty as Chief Justice was to lead the nation in a special Fourth of July reading of the Pledge of Allegiance that was broadcast live from outside the park’s Stanley Hotel.
Harlan Fiske Stone (right) being sworn-in as Chief Justice, July 3, 1941. Stone took both oaths in his cottage at the Sprague Hotel before Wayne H. Hackett, the United States Commissioner for Rocky Mountain National Park. Abner Sprague, owner of the hotel, stands in the background. Stone’s first public duty as Chief Justice was to lead the nation in a special Fourth of July reading of the Pledge of Allegiance broadcast live from the park.
Photograph by Charley Humberger, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
Click on the arrows or dots to see Chief Justice Stone’s Judicial Oath.
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Chief Justice Stone’s Judicial Oath, hand-typed by staff at Rocky Mountain National Park.<br />
Chief Justice Stone’s Judicial Oath, hand-typed by staff at Rocky Mountain National Park.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Click on the arrows or dots to see Harlan Fiske Stone being sworn-in as Chief Justice.
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