Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2022


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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January 2022
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Recent Decisions


January 24, 2022
         
Hughes v. Northwestern Univ. (19-1401)
Determining whether plan participants state plausible claims against plan fiduciaries for violations of ERISA’s duty of prudence requires a context-specific inquiry of the fiduciaries’ continuing duty to monitor investments and to remove imprudent ones as articulated in Tibble v. Edison Int’l, 575 U. S. 523; the Seventh Circuit erred in relying on the participants’ ultimate choice over their investments to excuse allegedly imprudent decisions by respondents.



January 20, 2022
         
Hemphill v. New York (20-637)
The trial court’s admission—over Hemphill’s objection—of the plea allocution transcript of an unavailable witness violated Hemphill’s Sixth Amendment right to confront the witnesses against him.



January 13, 2022
       
NFIB v. OSHA (21A244) (Per Curiam)
The Court grants the applications to stay the Occupational Safety & Health Administration’s challenged rule mandating that employers with at least 100 employees require covered workers to receive a COVID–19 vaccine.

       
Biden v. Missouri (21A240) (Per Curiam)
The Court grants the applications to stay the two injunctions barring the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ regulation requiring facilities that participate in Medicare and Medicaid to ensure that their employees are vaccinated against COVID–19.

         
Babcock v. Kijakazi (20-480)
Civil-service pension payments based on employment as a dual-status military technician are not payments based on “service as a member of a uniformed service” under 42 U. S. C. §415(a)(7)(A)(III).



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Other Duties as Assigned


Eleven days after Japan’s surprise attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Justice Owen J. Roberts to chair a fact-finding commission to review the catastrophe. The commission investigated questions into why the military was caught off-guard, if there was a dereliction of duty, and whether the military was adequately prepared. Justice Roberts took a six-week leave of absence from the Supreme Court, during which the five-man commission travelled to the territory of Hawaii, interviewed 127 people, and reviewed hundreds of documents. The final report was submitted to the President on January 23, 1942, and Justice Roberts was back to work on Monday, February 2.

 

The Pearl Harbor investigative commission at its first meeting on December 18, 1941. From left are Brigadier General Joseph T. McNarney, Admiral William H. Standley, Justice Owen J. Roberts, Rear Admiral Joseph Reeves and Major General Frank McCoy. The Recorder, Walter Bruce Howe, is at far right.
The Pearl Harbor investigative commission at its first meeting on December 18, 1941.
From left are Brigadier General Joseph T. McNarney, Admiral William H. Standley, Justice Owen J. Roberts, Rear Admiral Joseph Reeves and Major General Frank McCoy. The Recorder, Walter Bruce Howe, is at far right.
Photo by Harris & Ewing, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


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