Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Monday, Oct 25, 2021


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Recent Decisions


October 18, 2021
       
City of Tahlequah v. Bond (20-1668) (Per Curiam)
Officers Girdner and Vick are entitled to qualified immunity in this excessive force action brought under 42 U. S. C. §1983; the Tenth Circuit’s contrary holding is not based on a single precedent finding a Fourth Amendment violation under similar circumstances.

       
Rivas-Villegas v. Cortesluna (20-1539) (Per Curiam)
Officer Rivas-Villegas is entitled to qualified immunity in this excessive force action brought under 42 U. S. C. §1983; the Ninth Circuit’s holding that Circuit precedent “put him on notice that his conduct constituted excessive force” is reversed.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Grand Design – Ceilings of the Court


Many of the ceilings in the Supreme Court Building are elaborately decorated in the Beaux-Arts style. A few features of this architectural style include classical details such as columns and pediments, a hierarchy of interior spaces, and highly decorative surfaces like those found on the ceiling of the Main Reading Room in the Supreme Court Library. At the time of the building’s construction, artisans were called upon to complete the new Temple of Justice. Ezra Winter, a painter and muralist, won the commission to design the ceiling of the Supreme Court Library. Born in 1886 in Traverse City, Michigan, Mr. Winter studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts before becoming a fellow at the American Academy in Rome. The ceiling decoration is original and reflects Winter’s design.

 

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Main Reading Room of the Supreme Court Library.
Main Reading Room of the Supreme Court Library.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
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Photograph of Ezra Winter by Paul Juley.
Photograph of Ezra Winter by Paul Juley.
Photograph Archives, Smithsonian American Art Museum
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