Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Monday, Nov 29, 2021


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • The Court will convene for an argument session in the Courtroom at 10 a.m. The Justices will hear one oral argument. As a public health precaution, the Courtroom will be closed to the public, but an audio feed will be live-streamed and the audio will be available on the Court's website later in the day. 
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Oral Arguments

Week of Monday, November 29


Monday, November 29
       
Becerra v. Empire Health Foundation (20-1312)


Tuesday, November 30
       
Cummings v. Premier Rehab (20-219)
       
American Hospital Assn. v. Becerra (20-1114)


Wednesday, December 1
       
Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health (19-1392)


The audio recordings and transcripts of all oral arguments heard by the Supreme Court of the United States are posted on this website on the same day an argument is heard by the Court. Same-day transcripts are considered official but subject to final review.


Earlier Transcripts | Earlier Audio

Recent Decisions


November 22, 2021
         
Mississippi v. Tennessee (143, Orig.)
The waters of the Middle Claiborne Aquifer are subject to the judicial remedy of equitable apportionment; Mississippi’s complaint is dismissed without leave to amend.



October 18, 2021
       
City of Tahlequah v. Bond (20-1668) (Per Curiam)
Officers Girdner and Vick are entitled to qualified immunity in this excessive force action brought under 42 U. S. C. §1983; the Tenth Circuit’s contrary holding is not based on a single precedent finding a Fourth Amendment violation under similar circumstances.

       
Rivas-Villegas v. Cortesluna (20-1539) (Per Curiam)
Officer Rivas-Villegas is entitled to qualified immunity in this excessive force action brought under 42 U. S. C. §1983; the Ninth Circuit’s holding that Circuit precedent “put him on notice that his conduct constituted excessive force” is reversed.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

The Seventh Chief Justice


Morrison Remick Waite was born on November 29, 1816 in Lyme, Connecticut. He graduated from Yale College in 1837 and passed the Bar exam two years later. Waite moved to Toledo, Ohio where he developed an active legal practice and became an authority on real estate law. In 1849, he was elected to the Ohio General Assembly where he served for one term. In 1871, President Ulysses S. Grant appointed Waite as American counsel in the Geneva Arbitration, the purpose of which was to press U. S. claims against Great Britain for allowing Confederate ships to use British ports. In 1873, Waite was elected president of the Ohio Constitutional Convention, during which he learned that President Grant had nominated him as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. As Chief Justice, Waite authored over 1,000 opinions during his 14 years on the Bench from 1874 to 1888.

Half-length studio portrait photograph of Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite by Jose Maria Mora, circa 1874..
Half-length studio portrait photograph of Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite by Jose Maria Mora, circa 1874.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


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