Supreme Court of the United States
Oral arguments scheduled for the March session have been postponed.
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public from 4:30 p.m. on March 12, 2020, until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Although case filing deadlines have not been extended generally under Rule 30.1, the Court has issued an order addressing the extension of many filing deadlines.   

Today at the Court - Sunday, Mar 29, 2020


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public from 4:30 p.m. on March 12, 2020, until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Although case filing deadlines have not been extended generally under Rule 30.1, the Court has issued an order addressing the extension of many filing deadlines.     
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Recent Decisions


March 23, 2020
       
Davis v. United States (19-5421) (Per Curiam)
There is no legal basis for the Fifth Circuit’s practice of declining to review certain unpreserved factual arguments for plain error.

         
Comcast Corp. v. National Assn. of African-American Owned Media (18-1171)
A plaintiff who sues for racial discrimination in contracting under 42 U. S. C. §1981 bears the burden of showing that race was a but-for cause of the plaintiff’s injury, and that burden remains constant over the life of the lawsuit.

         
Kahler v. Kansas (18-6135)
Due process does not require Kansas to adopt an insanity test that turns on a defendant’s ability to recognize that his crime was morally wrong.

         
Allen v. Cooper (18-877)
Congress lacked authority to abrogate the States’ sovereign immunity from copyright infringement suits in the Copyright Remedy Clarification Act of 1990.

         
Guerrero-Lasprilla v. Barr (18-776)
Because the phrase “questions of law” in the Immigration and Nationality Act’s Limited Review Provision, 8 U. S. C. §1252(a)(2)(D), includes the application of a legal standard to undisputed or established facts, the Fifth Circuit erred in holding that it had no jurisdiction to consider petitioners’ “factual” due diligence claims for equitable tolling purposes.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

“Cut and Paste,” 1860s Style


Manipulating photographs is nearly as old as photography itself. While it may appear the Justices of the Supreme Court gathered at the same time for the camera, in reality, this portrait of the Chase Court was composed from several images by the famous portrait photographer Mathew Brady in March or April 1868. Sparing no expense, Brady took four photographs of the Justices on separate occasions and montaged the photographs to look as one. He then superimposed them over a painting of the Courtroom by his in-house painter, Carl Bersch. While Brady took individual portraits of dozens of Justices throughout his career, this is his only group portrait of the Supreme Court.

All together for the Camera: 150 years of Group Photographs  is one of several exhibitions currently on view on the ground floor of the Supreme Court Building.

 

The Chase Court, March-April 1868. From left: Justices Stephen J. Field, Samuel F. Miller, Nathan Clifford and Samuel Nelson, Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase, and Justices Robert C. Grier, Noah H. Swayne, and David Davis.
The Chase Court, March-April 1868. From left: Justices Stephen J. Field, Samuel F. Miller, Nathan Clifford and Samuel Nelson, Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase, and Justices Robert C. Grier, Noah H. Swayne, and David Davis. Click on the image to see two of Brady’s original glass plate negatives superimposed over his final product.
Mathew Brady Studio, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
Brady glass plate negatives courtesy of The National Archives


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