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Today at the Court - Thursday, Apr 19, 2018


  • The Supreme Court Building is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • The Court will next convene for a public session in the Courtroom at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 23.
  • Courtroom Lectures available within the next 30 days.
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Oral Arguments

Week of Monday, April 16


Monday, April 16
       
Wisconsin Central Ltd. v. United States (17-530)
       
WesternGeco LLC v. ION Geophysical Corp. (16-1011)


Tuesday, April 17
       
South Dakota v. Wayfair (17-494)
       
Lamar, Archer & Cofrin v. Appling (16-1215)


Wednesday, April 18
       
Lagos v. United States (16-1519)
       
Washington v. United States (17-269)


The transcripts of oral arguments are posted on this website on the same day an argument is heard by the Court. Same-day transcripts are considered official but subject to final review. The audio recordings of all oral arguments heard by the Supreme Court of the United States are available to the public at the end of each argument week. The audio recordings are posted on Fridays after Conference.


Earlier Transcripts | Earlier Audio

Recent Decisions


April 17, 2018
         
United States v. Microsoft Corp. (17-2)
The Second Circuit’s judgment is vacated, and the case is remanded with instructions to dismiss the case as moot.

         
Sessions v. Dimaya (15-1498)
The Ninth Circuit’s judgment—that 18 U. S. C. §16(b), which defines violent felony for purposes of the Immigration and Nationality Act’s removal provisions, is unconstitutionally vague—is affirmed.

         
Wilson v. Sellers (16-6855)
A federal habeas court reviewing an unexplained state-court decision on the merits should “look through” that decision to the last related state-court decision that provides a relevant rationale and presume that the unexplained decision adopted the same reasoning; the State may rebut the presumption by showing that the unexplained decision most likely relied on different grounds than the reasoned decision below.



April 02, 2018
       
Kisela v. Hughes (17-467) (Per Curiam)
Petitioner police officer is entitled to qualified immunity here, where his actions did not violate clearly established statutory or constitutional rights of which a reasonable person would have known.

         
Encino Motorcars, LLC v. Navarro (16-1362)
Because service advisors at car dealerships are “salesm[e]n . . . primarily engaged in . . . servicing automobiles,” 29 U. S. C. §213(b)(10)(A), they are exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act’s overtime-pay requirement.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Before they were Justices...


Byron R. White played on the University of Colorado’s undefeated football team in 1937. The following year, he deferred his Rhodes Scholarship for a semester to play professionally for a season with the Pittsburgh Pirates (today known as the Pittsburgh Steelers). Later, while attending Yale Law School, he took off a semester to play for the Detroit Lions. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954 and took his seat as an Associate Justice on April 16, 1962.

 

Byron “Whizzer” White was the runner-up for the Heisman Trophy in 1937. Cartoon highlighting White’s appointment to the “Bench” of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Byron “Whizzer” White was the runner-up for the Heisman Trophy in 1937.
Cartoon highlighting White’s appointment to the “Bench” of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


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