Supreme Court of the United States
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Today at the Court - Friday, Jul 3, 2020


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Recent Decisions


June 30, 2020
         
Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com B. V. (19-46)
A term styled “generic.com” is a generic name for a class of goods or services—and thus ineligible for federal trademark protection—only if the term has that meaning to consumers.

         
Espinoza v. Montana Dept. of Revenue (18-1195)
The application of the Montana Constitution’s “no-aid” provision to a state program providing tuition assistance to parents who send their children to private schools discriminated against religious schools and the families whose children attend or hope to attend them in violation of the Federal Constitution’s Free Exercise Clause.



June 29, 2020
         
Agency for Int’l Development v. Alliance for Open Society (19-177)
Because the foreign affiliates of American nongovernmental organizations possess no First Amendment rights, the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act’s limitation on funding organizations with “a policy explicitly opposing prostitution and sex trafficking,” 22 U. S. C. §7631(f), is not unconstitutional as applied to them.

         
June Medical Services L. L. C. v. Russo (18-1323)
The Fifth Circuit’s judgment, upholding a Louisiana law that requires abortion providers to hold admitting privileges at local hospitals, is reversed.

         
Seila Law LLC v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (19-7)
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s leadership by a single Director removable only for inefficiency, neglect, or malfeasance violates the separation of powers.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Thurgood Marshall Retires


Thurgood Marshall held several important legal positions that prepared him for a seat on the Supreme Court. From 1936 until 1961, he was a brilliant legal strategist with the NAACP and successfully argued nearly all of its civil rights cases before the Court, including the 1954 landmark case Brown  v. Board of Education. From 1961 to 1965, he was a federal judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and from 1965 to 1967, he represented the federal government before the Court as Solicitor General of the United States under President Lyndon B. Johnson. In 1967, President Johnson appointed him to the Supreme Court, where he served as a Justice behind the Bench after spending over 30 years as a lawyer in front of it. On June 28, 1991, he announced his retirement after serving nearly 24 years on the Court, and after a lifetime of service dedicated to equal justice under the law.

 

At the press conference to announce his retirement, Justice Marshall was asked why now?  He famously responded by saying, “I’m getting old and coming apart!” When asked how he would like to be remembered, Marshall responded, “That he did what he could with what he had.”
At the press conference to announce his retirement, Justice Marshall was asked why now? He famously responded by saying, “I’m getting old and coming apart!” When asked how he would like to be remembered, Marshall responded, “That he did what he could with what he had.”
Photograph by Charles Tasnadi for the Associated Press, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


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