Supreme Court of the United States
 

Today at the Court - Sunday, May 19, 2019


  • The Supreme Court Building is closed on weekends and federal holidays. The building is open to the public Monday - Friday, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Courtroom Lectures available within the next 30 days.
Calendar
Title and navigation
Title and navigation
<<<May 2019><<
May 2019
SMTWTFS
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
26
 
28293031 
       
Calendar Info/Key

 



Recent Decisions


May 13, 2019
         
Apple, Inc. v. Pepper (17-204)
Respondents, who purchased apps for their iPhones though Apple’s App Store, were direct purchasers from Apple under Illinois Brick Co. v. Illinois, 431 U. S. 720, and may sue Apple for allegedly monopolizing the retail market for the sale of iPhone apps.

         
Cochise Consultancy, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Hunt (18-315)
The limitations period in 31 U. S. C. §3731(b)(2)—which provides that a False Claims Act action must be brought within 3 years after the “the official of the United States charged with responsibility to act in the circumstances” knew or should have known the relevant facts, but not more than 10 years after the violation—applies in a qui tam suit in which the Federal Government has declined to intervene; the relator in a nonintervened suit is not “the official of the United States” whose knowledge triggers §3731(b)(2)’s limitations period.

         
Franchise Tax Bd. of Cal. v. Hyatt (17-1299)
Nevada v. Hall, 440 U. S. 410, is overruled; States retain their sovereign immunity from private suits brought in courts of other States.



April 29, 2019
         
Thacker v. TVA (17-1201)
Title 16 U. S. C. §831c(b), which serves to waive the Tennessee Valley Authority’s sovereign immunity from suit, is not subject to a discretionary function exception of the kind in the Federal Tort Claims Act.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Marbury Card Table


William Marbury, the well-known litigant from the case of Marbury  v. Madison (1803), previously owned this gate-leg card table. It is attributed to the Baltimore workshop of John Bankson and Richard Lawson and embodies the simple, classic lines of the early Federal style. The table is currently on display in the John Marshall Dining Room of the Supreme Court Building.

 

The table relies on intricate inlays for its decoration. Stylized floral motifs are featured within ovals on either side of the drawer, and bell flowers, associated with Baltimore furniture of the period, adorn each tapered leg.
The table relies on intricate inlays for its decoration. Stylized floral motifs are featured within ovals on either side of the drawer, and bell flowers, associated with Baltimore furniture of the period, adorn each tapered leg.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES 1 First Street, NE Washington, DC 20543