Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Although case filing deadlines have not been extended generally under Rule 30.1, the Court has issued an order addressing the extension of many filing deadlines.   

Today at the Court - Monday, Apr 6, 2020


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Although case filing deadlines have not been extended generally under Rule 30.1, the Court has issued an order addressing the extension of many filing deadlines.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
  • The Court will release an order list at 9:30 a.m.
  • The Court may announce opinions on the homepage beginning at 10 a.m. If more than one opinion will be issued, they will post in approximately five minute intervals. The Court will not take the Bench.
 
Calendar
Title and navigation
Title and navigation
<<<April 2020><<
April 2020
SMTWTFS
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  
       
Calendar Info/Key

 



Recent Decisions


April 06, 2020
         
Babb v. Wilkie (18-882)
The plain meaning of 29 U. S. C. §633a(a), the federal-sector provision of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, demands that personnel actions be untainted by any consideration of age, but but-for causation is important in determining the appropriate remedy that may be obtained.

         
Kansas v. Glover (18-556)
When a police officer lacks information negating an inference that a person driving is the vehicle’s owner, an investigative traffic stop made after running the vehicle’s license plate and learning that the registered owner’s driver’s license has been revoked is reasonable under the Fourth Amendment.



March 30, 2020
         
CITGO Asphalt Refining Co. v. Frescati Shipping Co. (18-565)
The plain language of the safe-berth clause in the parties’ subcharter agreement—requiring petitioners to designate a safe berth for a vessel to load and discharge cargo—establishes a warranty of safety.



March 23, 2020
       
Davis v. United States (19-5421) (Per Curiam)
There is no legal basis for the Fifth Circuit’s practice of declining to review certain unpreserved factual arguments for plain error.

         
Comcast Corp. v. National Assn. of African-American Owned Media (18-1171)
A plaintiff who sues for racial discrimination in contracting under 42 U. S. C. §1981 bears the burden of showing that race was a but-for cause of the plaintiff’s injury, and that burden remains constant over the life of the lawsuit.

         
Kahler v. Kansas (18-6135)
Due process does not require Kansas to adopt an insanity test that turns on a defendant’s ability to recognize that his crime was morally wrong.

         
Allen v. Cooper (18-877)
Congress lacked authority to abrogate the States’ sovereign immunity from copyright infringement suits in the Copyright Remedy Clarification Act of 1990.

         
Guerrero-Lasprilla v. Barr (18-776)
Because the phrase “questions of law” in the Immigration and Nationality Act’s Limited Review Provision, 8 U. S. C. §1252(a)(2)(D), includes the application of a legal standard to undisputed or established facts, the Fifth Circuit erred in holding that it had no jurisdiction to consider petitioners’ “factual” due diligence claims for equitable tolling purposes.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Samuel Blatchford Joins the Court


Samuel Blatchford devoted the first 25 years of his career to private practice, specializing in admiralty and international law. During his early career, he collected federal court decisions, eventually publishing 24 volumes entitled Blatchford’s Circuit Court Reports  that were widely used by attorneys and judges. In 1867, Blatchford received his first judicial appointment as a federal district judge in the Southern District of New York. After serving five years, he was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. In 1882, President Chester A. Arthur nominated him to fill the vacancy created when Supreme Court Justice Ward Hunt retired. Justice Blatchford took his seat on April 3 and served on the Court for 11 years before his death in 1893.

 

Associate Justice Samuel Blatchford. In 1890, the Supreme Court traveled to New York City to attend events celebrating the Centenary of the Federal Judiciary. On February 4, the noted portrait photographer Napoleon Sarony took a group photograph of the Justices as well as individual portraits of each Justice.
Associate Justice Samuel Blatchford. In 1890, the Supreme Court traveled to New York City to attend events celebrating the Centenary of the Federal Judiciary. On February 4, the noted portrait photographer Napoleon Sarony took a group photograph of the Justices as well as individual portraits of each Justice.
Photograph by Napoleon Sarony, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES 1 First Street, NE Washington, DC 20543