Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Sunday, Jun 13, 2021


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Recent Decisions


June 10, 2021
         
Borden v. United States (19-5410)
The decision of the Sixth Circuit—holding that an offense with a mental state of recklessness may qualify as a “violent felony” under the Armed Career Criminal Act’s elements clause, 18 U. S. C. §924(e)(2)(B)(i)—is reversed, and the case is remanded.



June 07, 2021
         
Sanchez v. Mayorkas (20-315)
An individual who entered the United States unlawfully is not eligible to become a lawful permanent resident under 8 U.S.C. §1255 even if the United States has granted the individual temporary protected status.



June 03, 2021
         
Van Buren v. United States (19-783)
An individual “exceeds authorized access” under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986, 18 U. S. C. §1030(a)(2), when he accesses a computer with authorization but then obtains information located in particular areas of the computer—such as files, folders, or databases—that are off-limits to him.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Get Your Lottery Tickets!


During the 19th and 20th centuries, lotteries were held by state governments to generate revenue for public projects. The Cohen’s firm sold lottery tickets and had offices in Baltimore, Maryland; Norfolk, Virginia; and Washington, D.C. In 1819, the Virginia legislature passed a law prohibiting the sale of unauthorized lottery tickets. After that law was passed, the Cohen’s firm sold six tickets from their Virginia office for the Grand National Lottery; while authorized by the United States Congress, this was prohibited in Virginia. Brothers Philip and Mendes Cohen were convicted by a local court and fined $100 for selling unauthorized tickets. After losing an appeal to the Virginia Supreme Court, the Cohens petitioned the Supreme Court of the United States, claiming the federal statute authorizing the sale of lottery tickets superseded the law of Virginia. In Cohens  v. Virginia (1821), the Court upheld the Cohen’s conviction. The Court ruled that federal courts had the authority to decide cases when state laws conflicted with federal laws, including the ability to review decisions of state supreme courts.

 

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Cohen’s advertisement from the Baltimore Patriot, August 2, 1813.
Cohen’s advertisement from the Baltimore Patriot, August 2, 1813.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
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Broadside detail featuring the Grand National Lottery Prize Scheme.
Broadside detail featuring the Grand National Lottery Prize Scheme.
Library of Congress
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