Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Tuesday, Jan 18, 2022


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • The Court will release an order list at 9:30 a.m.
  • The Court will convene for an argument session in the Courtroom at 10 a.m. The Justices will hear two oral arguments. As a public health precaution, the Courtroom will be closed to the public, but an audio feed will be live-streamed and the audio will be available on the Court's website later in the day. 
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Oral Arguments

Week of Monday, January 17


Tuesday, January 18
       
Shurtleff v. Boston (20-1800)
       
Cassirer v. Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection (20-1566)

Wednesday, January 19
       
Federal Election Commission v. Ted Cruz for Senate (21-12)
       
Concepcion v. United States (20-1650)

 

The audio recordings and transcripts of all oral arguments heard by the Supreme Court of the United States are posted on this website on the same day an argument is heard by the Court. Same-day transcripts are considered official but subject to final review.


Earlier Transcripts | Earlier Audio

Recent Decisions


January 13, 2022
       
NFIB v. OSHA (21A244) (Per Curiam)
The Court grants the applications to stay the Occupational Safety & Health Administration’s challenged rule mandating that employers with at least 100 employees require covered workers to receive a COVID–19 vaccine.

       
Biden v. Missouri (21A240) (Per Curiam)
The Court grants the applications to stay the two injunctions barring the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ regulation requiring facilities that participate in Medicare and Medicaid to ensure that their employees are vaccinated against COVID–19.

         
Babcock v. Kijakazi (20-480)
Civil-service pension payments based on employment as a dual-status military technician are not payments based on “service as a member of a uniformed service” under 42 U. S. C. §415(a)(7)(A)(III).



December 10, 2021
         
United States v. Texas (21-588 (21A85)) (Per Curiam)
The writ of certiorari is dismissed as improvidently granted and the application to vacate stay presented to Justice Alito and by him referred to the Court is denied.

         
Whole Woman’s Health v. Jackson (21-463)
A pre-enforcement challenge under the Federal Constitution to Texas Senate Bill 8—the Texas Heartbeat Act—may proceed past the motion to dismiss stage against certain of the named defendants but not others; the order of the District Court is affirmed in part and reversed in part, and the case is remanded.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Reed Named to High Court


On January 15, 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt nominated Solicitor General Stanley F. Reed to the Supreme Court of the United States. The early announcement was a bit of a surprise, as Justice George Sutherland’s retirement was not effective until January 17. Reed was confirmed by the Senate on January 25, and President Roosevelt signed his commission on January 27.

As the second order of business on January 31, Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes announced, “Mr. Stanley Reed, of Kentucky, has been nominated by the President for the office of Associate Justice and his nomination has been confirmed by the Senate. Mr. Reed is present. The Clerk will read his commission. Mr. Reed will then take the Oath of office prescribed by statute and he will be escorted by the Marshal to his seat on the bench.” Reed served on the Court for 19 years before retiring on February 25, 1957.

 

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Solicitor General Reed talks to the press after being nominated to the Supreme Court on January 15, 1938.
Solicitor General Reed talks to the press after being nominated to the Supreme Court on January 15, 1938.
Harris & Ewing, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
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Press caption for this photo reads: “He Has It In Writing ...  Stanley Reed has reason to smile after he leaves the White House. He is holding his official commission as Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States which was presented to him by President Roosevelt.”
Press caption for this photo reads: “He Has It In Writing ... Stanley Reed has reason to smile after he leaves the White House. He is holding his official commission as Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States which was presented to him by President Roosevelt.”
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
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