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Today at the Court - Thursday, Feb 21, 2019


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Oral Arguments

Week of Monday, February 18



Tuesday, February 19
       
Return Mail, Inc. v. USPS (17-1594)


Wednesday, February 20
       
Mission Product Holdings, Inc. v. Tempnology, LLC (17-1657)



The transcripts of oral arguments are posted on this website on the same day an argument is heard by the Court. Same-day transcripts are considered official but subject to final review. The audio recordings of all oral arguments heard by the Supreme Court of the United States are available to the public at the end of each argument week. The audio recordings are posted on Fridays after Conference.


Earlier Transcripts | Earlier Audio

Recent Decisions


February 20, 2019
         
Dawson v. Steager (17-419)
By taxing the federal pension benefits of U. S. Marshals Service retiree Dawson, while exempting from taxation the pension benefits of certain state and local law enforcement officers, West Virginia unlawfully discriminates against Mr. Dawson as 4 U. S. C. §111 forbids.

         
Timbs v. Indiana (17-1091)
The Eighth Amendment’s Excessive Fines Clause is an incorporated protection applicable to the States under the Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause.



February 19, 2019
       
Moore v. Texas (18-443) (Per Curiam)
The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals’ redetermination that Moore does not have an intellectual disability and is thus eligible for the death penalty is inconsistent with Moore v. Texas, 581 U. S. ___.



January 22, 2019
         
Helsinn Healthcare S. A. v. Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc. (17-1229)
The sale of an invention to a third party who is obligated to keep the invention confidential may place the invention “on sale” for purposes of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, which bars a person from receiving a patent on an invention that was “in public use, on sale, or otherwise available to the public before the effective filing date of the claimed invention,” 35 U. S. C. §102(a)(1).



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Congress Opens the Doors for Women to Practice before the Supreme Court


On February 15, 1879, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed into law a bill permitting women to be admitted to the Supreme Court Bar. The act to “relieve certain legal disabilities of women” reads:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That any woman who shall have been a member of the bar of the highest court of any State or Territory or of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia for the space of three years, and shall have maintained a good standing before such court, and who shall be a person of good moral character, shall, on the motion, and the production of such record, be admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the United States.”

A little over two weeks later, on March 3, 1879, Belva Lockwood became the first woman to be admitted to the Supreme Court Bar. Lockwood’s story is featured in the exhibit, In Re Lady Lawyers: The Rise of Women Attorneys and the Supreme Court, located on the ground floor of the Supreme Court Building.

 

Illustration of Belva Lockwood holding her Supreme Court Bar Certificate as published in The Daily Graphic, March 22, 1879.
Illustration of Belva Lockwood holding her Supreme Court Bar Certificate as published in The Daily Graphic, March 22, 1879.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


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