Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

The Honorable Ketanji Brown Jackson
The Honorable Ketanji Brown Jackson
104th Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States


Today at the Court - Saturday, Jul 2, 2022


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Recent Decisions


June 30, 2022
         
Biden v. Texas (21-954)
The Government’s rescission of Migrant Protection Protocols did not violate section 1225 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, and the then-Secretary of Homeland Security’s October 29 Memoranda constituted valid final agency action.

         
West Virginia v. EPA (20-1530)
Congress did not grant the Environmental Protection Agency in Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act the authority to devise emissions caps based on the generation shifting approach the Agency took in the Clean Power Plan.



June 29, 2022
         
Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta (21-429)
The Federal Government and the State have concurrent jurisdiction to prosecute crimes committed by non-Indians against Indians in Indian country.

         
Torres v. Texas Department of Public Safety (20-603)
By ratifying the Constitution, the States agreed their sovereignty would yield to the national power to raise and support the Armed Forces; Congress may exercise this power to authorize private damages suits against nonconsenting States, as in the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994.



June 27, 2022
         
Kennedy v. Bremerton School Dist. (21-418)
The Free Exercise and Free Speech Clauses of the First Amendment protect an individual engaging in a personal religious observance from government reprisal; the Constitution neither mandates nor permits the government to suppress such religious expression.

         
Concepcion v. United States (20-1650)
Section 404(b) of the First Step Act of 2018, 132 Stat. 5222, allows district courts to consider intervening changes of law or fact in exercising their discretion to reduce a sentence.

         
Xiulu Ruan v. United States (20-1410)
For the crime of prescribing controlled substances outside the usual course of professional practice in violation of 21 U. S. C. §841, the mens rea “knowingly or intentionally” applies to the statute’s “except as authorized” clause.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

The Supreme Court and the Declaration of Independence


Although the Declaration of Independence is not law, it was the most important foundational document in creating what would become the United States of America. Most of the men who signed it would go on to serve important roles in our new country, including two who were appointed by President George Washington to the Supreme Court of the United States. James Wilson was born in Scotland in 1742 and immigrated to Philadelphia in 1766. One of the first six Justices on the Court, he was also the first Justice to take his Judicial Oath on October 5, 1789. Justice Wilson served on the Court for eight years until his death in 1798. Samuel Chase was born in 1741 in what was then the colony of Maryland, and took his seat in 1796. Justice Chase served on the Court for 15 years until his death in 1811.

The National Archives in Washington, D.C. is responsible for the preservation of the Declaration of Independence, and you can read a full transcript of it here.

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Woodcut of Justice James Wilson after a miniature watercolor, from Benson John Lossing’s “Biographical Sketches of the Signers of the Declaration of American Independence” (1848).
Woodcut of Justice James Wilson after a miniature watercolor, from Benson John Lossing’s “Biographical Sketches of the Signers of the Declaration of American Independence” (1848).
Benson Lossing & William Barritt after Jean Pierre Henri Elouis, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
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Engraving of Justice Samuel Chase from 1836, after a painting made in the last year of his life.
Engraving of Justice Samuel Chase from 1836, after a painting made in the last year of his life.
J. B. Forrest after John Wesley Jarvis, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
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