Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Thursday, Jan 21, 2021


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Oral Arguments

Week of Monday, January 18



Tuesday, January 19
       
FCC v. Prometheus Radio Project (19-1231)
       
National Assn. of Broadcasters v. Prometheus Radio Project (19-1241)
Consolidated
       
BP P.L.C. v. Mayor and City Council Baltimore (19-1189)



The transcripts of oral arguments are posted on this website on the same day an argument is heard by the Court. Same-day transcripts are considered official but subject to final review. The audio recordings of all oral arguments heard by the Supreme Court of the United States are available to the public at the end of each argument week. The audio recordings are posted on Fridays after Conference.


Earlier Transcripts | Earlier Audio

Recent Decisions


January 14, 2021
         
Chicago v. Fulton (19-357)
The mere retention of estate property after the filing of a bankruptcy petition does not violate 11 U. S. C. §362(a)(3), which operates as a “stay” of “any act” to “exercise control” over the property of the estate.



December 18, 2020
         
Trump v. New York (20-366) (Per Curiam)
Because plaintiffs have not shown standing and because the claims presented are not ripe for adjudication, the District Court’s judgment is vacated, and the case is remanded with instructions to dismiss for lack of jurisdiction.



December 14, 2020
       
Shinn v. Kayer (19-1302) (Per Curiam)
Under the deferential standard of the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, the Ninth Circuit exceeded its authority in rejecting the state court’s determination that Kayer failed to show prejudice in his ineffective-assistance-of-counsel claim.

     
Texas v. New Mexico (65, Orig.)
Texas’s motion to review the Pecos River Master’s determination—that New Mexico was entitled to a delivery credit for evaporated water stored at Texas’s request under the Pecos River Compact—is denied.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

The 1894 Series and the $5 Marshall Stamp


The Bureau of Engraving and Printing first began printing stamps in 1894. Since then, the U.S. Postal Service has issued nearly 30 postage stamps featuring Supreme Court Justices, prominent cases, famous advocates before the Court, and the Supreme Court Building. The 1894 series included 18 stamps that ranged in value from the 1-cent Benjamin Franklin stamp to the $5 John Marshall stamp. Others represented in this series include seven presidents, General William T. Sherman, Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, and Oliver Hazard Perry.

 

Chief Justice John Marshall $5 postage stamp issued on December 10, 1894..
Chief Justice John Marshall $5 postage stamp issued on December 10, 1894.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


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