Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Monday, May 23, 2022


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • The Court will release an order list at 9:30 a.m. 
  • The Court may announce opinions on the homepage beginning at 10 a.m. If more than one opinion will be issued, they will post in approximately ten minute intervals. The Court will not take the Bench.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Recent Decisions


May 23, 2022
         
Morgan v. Sundance, Inc. (21-328)
Federal courts may not adopt an arbitration-specific rule conditioning a waiver of the right to arbitrate on a showing of prejudice.

         
Shinn v. Martinez Ramirez (20-1009)
Under 28 U. S. C. §2254(e)(2), a federal habeas court may not conduct an evidentiary hearing or otherwise consider evidence beyond the state-court record based on the ineffective assistance of state postconviction counsel.



May 16, 2022
         
Patel v. Garland (20-979)
Federal courts lack jurisdiction to review facts found as part of any judgment relating to the granting of discretionary-relief in immigration proceedings enumerated under 8 U. S. C. §1252(a)(2)(B)(i).

         
Federal Election Comm’n v. Ted Cruz (21-12)
Section 304 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002—which limits the amount of post-election contributions that may be used to repay a candidate who lends money to his own campaign—unconstitutionally burdens core political speech.



May 02, 2022
         
Shurtleff v. Boston (20-1800)
Because Boston’s flag-raising program did not constitute government speech, Boston’s refusal to let petitioners fly their flag violated the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

A Walking Encyclopedia of the Law


Benjamin N. Cardozo was born on May 24, 1870 in New York City. As a young boy, Cardozo was tutored by Horatio Alger, a famed American author of children’s stories focused on overcoming adversity through perseverance. At the age of 15, Cardozo entered Columbia University and immediately upon graduation enrolled in Columbia Law School. After 22 years in private practice, Cardozo began his judicial career at the age of 43, when he briefly served on the New York Supreme Court before serving on the New York State Court of Appeals for 18 years.

A noted legal scholar, Cardozo was invited to deliver Yale Law School’s prestigious Storr Lecture series. He published his lectures in a 1921 volume entitled, The Nature of the Judicial Process, a treatise on how judges decide cases, which was highly regarded among his legal peers. Known for his photographic memory, Charles Evans Hughes, Jr. once described Cardozo as a “walking encyclopedia of the law.” Appointed to the Supreme Court in 1932 by President Herbert Hoover, Cardozo served for six years and authored more than 100 opinions.

 

Half-length portrait of Justice Benjamin N. Cardozo by Eben F. Comins, circa 1943.
Half-length portrait of Justice Benjamin N. Cardozo by Eben F. Comins, circa 1943.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


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