Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Monday, May 17, 2021


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • The Court will release an order list at 9:30 a.m.
  • The Court may announce opinions on the homepage beginning at 10 a.m. If more than one opinion will be issued, they will post in approximately ten minute intervals. The Court will not take the Bench.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Recent Decisions


May 17, 2021
         
Edwards v. Vannoy (19-5807)
The jury-unanimity rule announced in Ramos v. Louisiana, 590 U. S. ___, does not apply retroactively on federal collateral review.

         
BP p.l.c. v. Mayor and City Council of Baltimore (19-1189)
Where defendant energy companies premised 28 U. S. C. §1447(d) removal in part on the federal officer removal statute, §1442, the Fourth Circuit erred in holding that it lacked jurisdiction to consider all grounds for removal rejected by the District Court.

         
CIC Servs., LLC v. IRS (19-930)
A suit to enjoin IRS Notice 2016–66 does not trigger the Anti-Injunction Act even though a violation of the Notice may result in a tax penalty.

         
Caniglia v. Strom (20-157)
Neither the holding nor logic of Cady v. Dombrowski, 413 U. S. 433, justifies the removal of Caniglia’s firearms from his home by police officers under a “community caretaking exception” to the Fourth Amendment’s warrant requirement.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

A Confectionary Conundrum: Is Chocolate Food or Candy?


In the 1931 case, McCaughn  v. Hershey Chocolate Company, the Court addressed an $8 million confectionary conundrum: is chocolate food or candy? The Hershey Chocolate Company argued that its sweetened chocolates had wrongly been taxed at the same rate as candy, when they should have been considered food products instead. Although the Court noted that traditional candies consisted almost entirely of sugar, it concluded that the Revenue Act’s definition of “candy” encompassed a wider array of sweets, as used in everyday parlance and in interpretations of the tax statute by the Treasury Department. On that basis, the Court determined that Hershey’s chocolate was lawfully taxed as candy.

 

Hershey’s chocolate bar candy wrapper, c. 1930.
Hershey’s chocolate bar candy wrapper, c. 1930.


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