Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Thursday, May 6, 2021


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Oral Arguments

Week of Monday, May 3



Tuesday, May 4
       
Terry v. United States (20-5904)



The transcripts of oral arguments are posted on this website on the same day an argument is heard by the Court. Same-day transcripts are considered official but subject to final review. The audio recordings of all oral arguments heard by the Supreme Court of the United States are available to the public at the end of each argument week. The audio recordings are posted on Fridays after Conference.


Earlier Transcripts | Earlier Audio

Recent Decisions


April 29, 2021
         
Niz-Chavez v. Garland (19-863)
A notice to appear sufficient to trigger the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996’s stop-time rule is a single document containing all the information about an individual’s removal hearing specified in 8 U. S. C. §1229(a)(1).



April 26, 2021
       
Alaska v. Wright (20-940) (Per Curiam)
The requirement under 28 U. S. C. §2254(a) that a habeas petitioner be “in custody pursuant to the judgment of a State court” is not met if the state judgment is simply a necessary predicate to a federal conviction.



April 22, 2021
         
Jones v. Mississippi (18-1259)
A discretionary sentencing system is both constitutionally necessary and constitutionally sufficient to sentence a defendant who committed a homicide when he or she was under 18 to life without parole; a separate factual finding of permanent incorrigibility is not required.

         
Carr v. Saul (19-1442)
Principles of issue-exhaustion do not require Social Security disability claimants to argue at the agency level that the administrative law judges hearing their disability claims were unconstitutionally appointed.

         
AMG Capital Management, LLC v. FTC (19-508)
Section 13(b) of the Federal Trade Commission Act does not authorize the Commission to seek, or a court to award, equitable monetary relief such as restitution or disgorgement.



More Opinions...

What's New

Forgotten Legacy: Judicial Portraits by Cornelia Adèle Fassett


Discover the work of Cornelia Adèle Fassett, one of the first female portrait artists of the 19th century to portray American presidents, politicians, and Supreme Court Justices.

View Online

 

Portrait of Cornelia Adèle Fassett by Mathew Brady.
Portrait of Cornelia Adèle Fassett by Mathew Brady.
Architect of the Capitol




Did You Know...

The Original Spam Filter: Your Front Door


The 1970 case Rowan  v. United States Post Office Department concerned the Postal Revenue and Federal Salary Act, which allowed homeowners to remove themselves from mailing lists for lewd advertisements by notifying the Postmaster General. Companies claimed that the Act negatively affected their business activities and violated their constitutional right to free speech. The Court disagreed, holding that, because “[t]he asserted right of a mailer . . . stops at the outer boundary of every person’s domain,” mailers could not force homeowners to continue receiving offensive mailings.

 

The eight-man Burger Court as it was comprised from June 23, 1969, when Chief Justice Burger joined the Court, until June 9, 1970. The Court sat with only eight members until Justice Harry A. Blackmun joined the Court. This photograph was taken the same day the 1970 Burger Court posed with Justice Blackmun in order to record their having sat together as a group.
At the time of the Rowan decision on May 4, 1970, there were only eight sitting Justices.
Seated from left are Justices John M. Harlan, Hugo L. Black, Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, and Justices William O. Douglas and William J. Brennan, Jr.
Standing from left are Justices Thurgood Marshall, Potter Stewart, and Byron R. White.
Photograph by Robert S. Oakes, National Geographic Society, Courtesy of the Supreme Court of the United States


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