Supreme Court of the United States
 

Today at the Court - Wednesday, Apr 24, 2019


  • The Supreme Court Building is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • The Court will convene for a public session in the Courtroom at 10 a.m. The Justices will hear two, one-hour oral arguments.
  • The Court may announce opinions, which are posted on the homepage after announcement from the Bench.
  • Courtroom Lectures available within the next 30 days.
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Oral Arguments

Week of Monday, April 22


Monday, April 22
       
Food Marketing Institute v. Argus Leader Media (18-481)
       
Fort Bend County, TX v. Davis (18-525)


Tuesday, April 23
       
Dept. of Commerce v. New York (18-966)
       
Mitchell v. Wisconsin (18-6210)
       
Rehaif v. United States (17-9560)


Wednesday, April 24
       
Quarles v. United States (17-778)
       
Taggart v. Lorenzen (18-489)



The transcripts of oral arguments are posted on this website on the same day an argument is heard by the Court. Same-day transcripts are considered official but subject to final review. The audio recordings of all oral arguments heard by the Supreme Court of the United States are available to the public at the end of each argument week. The audio recordings are posted on Fridays after Conference.


Earlier Transcripts | Earlier Audio

Recent Decisions


April 24, 2019
         
Lamps Plus, Inc. v. Varela (17-988)
Under the Federal Arbitration Act, an ambiguous agreement cannot provide the necessary contractual basis for concluding that the parties agreed to submit to class arbitration.



April 23, 2019
         
Emulex Corp. v. Varjabedian (18-459)
Certiorari dismissed as improvidently granted.



April 01, 2019
         
Bucklew v. Precythe (17-8151)
Baze v. Rees, 553 U. S. 35, and Glossip v. Gross, 576 U. S. ___, govern all Eighth Amendment challenges alleging that a method of execution inflicts unconstitutionally cruel pain; petitioner’s as-applied challenge to Missouri’s single-drug execution protocol—that it would cause him severe pain because of his particular medical condition—fails to satisfy the Baze-Glossip test.

         
Biestek v. Berryhill (17-1184)
A vocational expert’s refusal to provide private market-survey data during a Social Security disability benefits hearing upon the applicant’s request does not categorically preclude the testimony from counting as “substantial evidence” in federal court under 42 U. S. C. §405(g).



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

The Constitution Tree


As the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution approached, the United States Constitution Sesquicentennial Commission issued a challenge to individuals, schools, clubs, and organizations, stating the most fitting way to celebrate the date was to plant trees: “Speeches are of the moment, trees are of the time. They are living evidence of the planter’s faith in the future, and the living reminder of the reason for which they have been planted.”

On April 19, 1938, a Constitution Tree was planted on the grounds of the Supreme Court Building. The tree, a scarlet oak, was one of hundreds of Constitution Trees planted across the country, and was donated by the Maryland Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Other participants in the planting ceremony included the United States Marine Band and Boy Scout troops from Riverdale and Hyattsville, Maryland. Sadly, the Constitution Tree suffered damage and was removed in November 2016.

 

Members of the Maryland Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution plant a Constitution Tree in 1938. Mrs. William Chase (holding shovel) was the chair of the chapter’s Conservation Committee, and requested permission from Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, who secured the agreement of the rest of the Justices.
Members of the Maryland Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution plant a Constitution Tree in 1938. Mrs. William Chase (holding shovel) was the chair of the chapter’s Conservation Committee, and requested permission from Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, who secured the agreement of the rest of the Justices.
Photograph by Wide World Photos, Inc., Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


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