Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Friday, May 14, 2021


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Recent Decisions


April 29, 2021
         
Niz-Chavez v. Garland (19-863)
A notice to appear sufficient to trigger the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996’s stop-time rule is a single document containing all the information about an individual’s removal hearing specified in 8 U. S. C. §1229(a)(1).



April 26, 2021
       
Alaska v. Wright (20-940) (Per Curiam)
The requirement under 28 U. S. C. §2254(a) that a habeas petitioner be “in custody pursuant to the judgment of a State court” is not met if the state judgment is simply a necessary predicate to a federal conviction.



April 22, 2021
         
Jones v. Mississippi (18-1259)
A discretionary sentencing system is both constitutionally necessary and constitutionally sufficient to sentence a defendant who committed a homicide when he or she was under 18 to life without parole; a separate factual finding of permanent incorrigibility is not required.

         
Carr v. Saul (19-1442)
Principles of issue-exhaustion do not require Social Security disability claimants to argue at the agency level that the administrative law judges hearing their disability claims were unconstitutionally appointed.

         
AMG Capital Management, LLC v. FTC (19-508)
Section 13(b) of the Federal Trade Commission Act does not authorize the Commission to seek, or a court to award, equitable monetary relief such as restitution or disgorgement.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

Courting a Judicial Job


By the 1930s, the Justices had institutionalized the practice of hiring law clerks. These law school graduates assist the Justices with reviewing lower court opinions, research, and drafting opinions. Today, most law clerks have served clerkships for lower court judges before beginning a one-year term at the Supreme Court of the United States.

Clerking at the Court served as a valuable learning experience for nine future Justices:

  • Byron R. White clerked for Chief Justice Fred Vinson during the 1946 Term.
  • William H. Rehnquist clerked for Justice Robert H. Jackson during the 1952 Term.
  • John Paul Stevens clerked for Justice Wiley B. Rutledge during the 1947 Term.
  • Stephen G. Breyer clerked for Justice Arthur J. Goldberg during the 1964 Term.
  • John G. Roberts, Jr., clerked for Justice William H. Rehnquist during the 1980 Term.
  • Elena Kagan clerked for Justice Thurgood Marshall during the 1987 Term.
  • Neil M. Gorsuch clerked for then-retired Justice Byron R. White and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy during the 1993 Term.
  • Brett M. Kavanaugh clerked for Justice Anthony M. Kennedy during the 1993 Term.
  • Amy Coney Barrett clerked for Justice Antonin Scalia during the 1998 Term.

 

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Byron R. White shown leaving the Supreme Court Building while serving as a law clerk to Chief Justice Fred Vinson, September 1946.
Byron R. White shown leaving the Supreme Court Building while serving as a law clerk to Chief Justice Fred Vinson, September 1946.
Photograph by Harris & Ewing, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
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Supreme Court law clerks, including future Justice John Paul Stevens (middle row, second to right), 1947.
Supreme Court law clerks, including future Justice John Paul Stevens (middle row, second to right), 1947.
Courtesy of Justice John Paul Stevens’s family.
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Justice Robert H. Jackson (center) with his law clerks, William H. Rehnquist (left) and C. George Niebank, Jr. (right). 1952.
Justice Robert H. Jackson (center) with his law clerks, William H. Rehnquist (left) and C. George Niebank, Jr. (right). 1952.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States
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