Supreme Court of the United States
Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.

Today at the Court - Wednesday, Jun 3, 2020


Building closed to the public

  • Out of concern for the health and safety of the public and Supreme Court employees, the Supreme Court Building will be closed to the public until further notice. The Building will remain open for official business. Please see all COVID-19 announcements here.
  • All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended.
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Recent Decisions


June 01, 2020
         
Nasrallah v. Barr (18-1432)
Title 8 U. S. C. §§1252(a)(2)(C) and (D) do not preclude judicial review of a removable noncitizen’s factual challenges to an order denying relief under the international Convention Against Torture, which protects noncitizens from removal to a country where they would likely face torture.

         
Thole v. U. S. Bank N. A. (17-1712)
Because petitioners, whose defined-benefit retirement plan guarantees them a fixed payment each month regardless of the plan’s value or its fiduciaries’ investment decisions, have no concrete stake in this Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 lawsuit against the fiduciaries, they lack Article III standing.

         
Banister v. Davis (18-6943)
Because a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 59(e) motion to alter or amend a habeas court’s judgment is not a second or successive habeas petition under 28 U. S. C. §2244(b), Banister’s appeal was timely.

         
Financial Oversight and Management Bd. for Puerto Rico v. Aurelius Investment, LLC (18-1334)
The Appointments Clause does not restrict the appointment or selection of members of Puerto Rico’s Financial Oversight and Management Board, who are appointed by the President without the Senate’s advice and consent.

         
GE Energy Power Conversion France SAS v. Outokumpu Stainless USA, LLC (18-1048)
The Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards does not conflict with domestic equitable estoppel doctrines that permit the enforcement of arbitration agreements by nonsignatories to those agreements.



More Opinions...

Did You Know...

John Marshall Featured on U.S. Treasury Notes


John Marshall, the longest serving Chief Justice, was featured on a $20 Treasury Note in 1890 and 1891, and on a $500 note in 1918. Others featured in the 1890s series, mostly from the Civil War era, were Edwin Stanton ($1), James McPherson ($2), George H. Thomas ($5), Philip Sheridan ($10), William Seward ($50), David Farragut ($100), William T. Sherman ($500), and George Meade ($1,000). While it is unknown why Marshall was featured on these Treasury Notes, he does have a history with the National Bank. Marshall served as Chief Justice during the important case of McCulloch  v. Maryland  (1819), in which the Court ruled that states could not impose taxes on the National Bank. The opinion was one of Marshall’s most important, expanding the powers of the federal government and establishing that the Constitution and federal laws “form the supreme law of the land” versus state laws.

 

A $20 Treasury Note from 1890 featuring a portrait of Chief Justice John Marshall.
A $20 Treasury Note from 1890 featuring a portrait of Chief Justice John Marshall.
Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States


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