Supreme Court of the United States
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The Supreme Court of the United States


Members:

Chief Justice of the United StatesJOHN G. ROBERTS, JR.

ANTHONY M. KENNEDY

CLARENCE THOMAS

RUTH BADER GINSBURG

STEPHEN G. BREYER

SAMUEL A. ALITO, JR.

SONIA SOTOMAYOR

ELENA KAGAN



Retired JusticesSANDRA DAY O’CONNOR

DAVID H. SOUTER

JOHN PAUL STEVENS




The Supreme Court consists of the Chief Justice of the United States and such number of Associate Justices as may be fixed by Congress. The number of Associate Justices is currently fixed at eight (28 U.S.C. §1). Power to nominate the Justices is vested in the President of the United States and appointments are made with the advice and consent of the Senate. Article III, §1, of the Constitution further provides that "[t]he Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behavior, and shall, at stated Times, receive for their Services, a Compensation, which shall not be diminished during their Continuance in Office."

•  Biographies of Current Justices of the Supreme Court


Officers:

Counselor to the Chief JusticeJEFFREY P. MINEAR

ClerkSCOTT HARRIS

LibrarianLINDA MASLOW

MarshalPAMELA TALKIN

Reporter of DecisionsCHRISTINE L. FALLON

Court CounselETHAN TORREY

CuratorCATHERINE E. FITTS

Director of Information TechnologyROBERT J. HAWKINS

Public Information OfficerKATHLEEN L. ARBERG





Organization Structure

Court Officers assist the Court in the performance of its functions. They include the Counselor to the Chief Justice, the Clerk, the Librarian, the Marshal, the Reporter of Decisions, the Court Counsel, the Curator, the Director of Information Technology, and the Public Information Officer. The Counselor is appointed by the Chief Justice. The Clerk, Reporter of Decisions, Librarian, and Marshal are appointed by the Court. All other Court Officers are appointed by the Chief Justice in consultation with the Court.


Mission


The Supreme Court is the highest tribunal in the nation for all cases and controversies arising under the Constitution or the laws of the United States. The Court stands as the final arbiter of the law and guardian of constitutional liberties.


Statutory Authority

Article III, §1, of the Constitution provides that "[t]he judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish." The Supreme Court of the United States was created in accordance with this provision and by authority of the Judiciary Act of September 24, 1789 (1 Stat. 73). It was organized on February 2, 1790.

According to the Constitution (Art. III, §2): "The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, under their Authority;—to all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;—to all Cases of admiralty and maritime Jurisdiction;—to Controversies to which the United States shall be a Party;—to Controversies between two or more States;—between a State and Citizens of another State;—between Citizens of different States;—between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of different States, and between a State, or the Citizens thereof, and foreign States, Citizens or Subjects.

"In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public ministers and Consuls, and those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have original Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make."

Appellate jurisdiction has been conferred upon the Supreme Court by various statutes, under the authority given Congress by the Constitution. The basic statute effective at this time in conferring and controlling jurisdiction of the Supreme Court may be found in 28 U.S.C. §1251 et seq., and various special statutes. Rulemaking Power. Congress has from time to time conferred upon the Supreme Court power to prescribe rules of procedure to be followed by the lower courts of the United States. See 28 U.S.C. §2071 et seq.

 

Performance, Budget, and Planning

•  Chief Justice's Year-End Reports on the Federal Judiciary

 

General Contacts

Where to Send Questions or Comments:
For technical questions or to report problems with this website, email: Webmaster

For time sensitive or urgent questions please contact the Public Information Office at the following number:
202-479-3211, Reporters press 1


Contact the Public Information Office by US Mail:

Public Information Officer
Supreme Court of the United States
1 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20543



Other Helpful Telephone Numbers

Clerk's Office: 202-479-3011
Visitor Information Line: 202-479-3030
Opinion Announcements: 202-479-3360

Or see our "Contact Us" page for more contact information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 27, 2016 | Version 2014.1